Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/97349
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Insights And Hopes In Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantations
Author: Shahrokhi S.
Menaa F.
Alimoghaddam K.
McGuckin C.
Ebtekar M.
Abstract: Over 20.000 umblical cord blood transplantations (UCBT) have been carried out around the world. Indeed, UCBT represents an attractive source of donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and, offer interesting features (e.g., lower graft-versus-host disease) compared to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Thereby, UCBT often represents the unique curative option against several blood diseases. Recent advances in the field of UCBT, consisted to develop strategies to expand umbilical stem cells and shorter the timing of their engraftment, subsequently enhancing their availability for enhanced efficacy of transplantation into indicated patients with malignant diseases (e.g., leukemia) or non-malignant diseases (e.g., thalassemia major). Several studies showed that the expansion and homing of UCBSCs depends on specific biological factors and cell types (e.g., cytokines, neuropeptides, co-culture with stromal cells). In this review, we extensively present the advantages and disadvantages of current hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs), compared to UBCT. We further describe the importance of cord blood content and obstetric factors on cord blood selection, and report the recent approaches that can be undertook to improve cord blood stem cell expansion as well as engraftment. Eventually, we provide two majors examples underlining the importance of UCBT as a potential cure for blood diseases. © 2012 Somayeh Shahrokhi et al.
Editor: 
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1155/2012/572821
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84870220319&partnerID=40&md5=1e50e474ce4d4fea0fbf114c34d88f03
Date Issue: 2012
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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