Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/95549
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Effects Of Serial Lesion On Hydrossaline Retention Induced By Walker-256 Tumor
Author: Guimaraes F.
Rettori O.
Fernandas O.A.
Abstract: The systemic effects observed during the Walker-256 rat tumor development suggest alterations in centrally regulated homeostatic mechanisms. These effects are manifested by sodium retention (decrease in renal sodium excretion with increase in Na plasmatic concentration), normal or increased water ingestion, water retention (low urine volumes with increased osmolallty) and anorexia paradoxically accompanied by body weight Increase. In this work we have followed these systemic effects development in tumor bearing rats that were submitted to total septal lesion. Lesioned and sham-operated rats received multifocal subcutaneous inoculations of Walker-256 tumoral cells 30 days after stereotaxic surgery. This experimental model causes the antetipation and synchronisation of the systemic effects. Changes in body weight, food intake, and urine (volume, osmolallty and Na , K excretion) were daily and individually followed. It was observed that both, lesioned and sham-operated groups, showed anorexia and sodium retention, however, the water control responses were different in the two groups. In the septal group rets showed marked increases in water intake and urine volume (up to 2,5 mes higher than in the shanvoperatad). These results suggest that Na retention was a consequence of direct Iterations on renal control mechanisms (it was not signifacantJy altered by the septal lesion). On the other hand, the compensatory mechanisms participating in the water retention of shamoperated rats, seemed to be partially abolished after the septal lesion.
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Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-33749145404&partnerID=40&md5=55cb14d55c49d8d18b018f12726889de
Date Issue: 1996
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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