Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/94831
Type: Artigo de evento
Title: Turbidimetric Determination Of Sulphate Employing Gravity Flow-based Systems
Author: Vieira J.A.
Raimundo Jr. I.M.
Reis B.F.
Abstract: A gravity flow-based manifold to perform turbidimetric determination of sulphate, comparing different approaches, such as sequential injection analysis (SIA), FIA with multicommutation and binary sampling (FIA-MBS), FIA with sandwich sampling (FIA-SS) and monosegmented flow analysis (MSFA) is described. Solutions of 5.0% barium chloride, 0.25 moll-1 perchloric acid and 0.3% EDTA in 0.2 moll-1 NaOH were used as precipitating agent, carrier fluid and cleaning solution, respectively. After optimisation, SIA, FIA-MBS and FIA-SS approaches showed linear response ranges from 40 to 200 mgl-1, while for MSFA the range was from 20 to 125 mgl-1. In the SIA system, a sampling frequency of 30 samples per hour was obtained, while a value of 40 samples per hour was obtained when FIA-MSB, FIA-SS and MSFA approaches were employed. The flow manifold was evaluated by determining sulphate in plant, bovine liver and blood serum digests. The SIA, FIA-SS, FIA-MBS and MSFA systems showed a R.S.D. of 3.2, 2.7, 2.0 and 1.0%, respectively, expressed as the relative standard deviation of the signal intensities of six measurements of a 120 mgl-1 SO42- solution. When the results were compared with those obtained by conventional FIA, no significant differences were observed for FIA-MSB, FIA-SS and MSFA at a confidence level of 95%, while for SIA the results were similar at a level of 97.5%. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.
Editor: 
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/S0003-2670(01)00797-8
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035800107&partnerID=40&md5=4fef7ea7dd5da35b524c7303e28f70b9
Date Issue: 2001
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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