Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/94445
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Leptin As A Marker Of Sexual Dimorphism In Newborn Infants
Author: Pardo I.M.C.G.
Geloneze B.
Tambascia M.A.
Pereira J.L.
Barros Filho A.A.
Abstract: Objective: To determine cord blood leptin levels in newborns appropriate for gestational age, according to gender, birth weight, birth height and ponderal index. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out with 132 term newborns appropriate for gestational age (68 females, 64 males), gestational age between 35-42 weeks. Data were collected through interviews with the mothers at the maternity, anthropometrycal study of the newborns, and cord blood estradiol, testosterone and leptin assays obtained immediately after birth. Results: The levels of leptin were significantly higher in females than in males (8.34±0.65 ng/ml versus 6.06±0.71 ng/ml; p = 0.000). The concentrations of estradiol and testosterone did not differ between males and females. Leptin levels were positively correlated with gestational age (r = 0.394, p < 0.01), birth weight (r = 0.466, p < 0.01), birth length (r = 0.335, p < 0.01) and ponderal index (r = 0.326, p < 0.01). Conclusions: Leptin concentration in the umbilical cord is positively correlated with gestational age, birth weight, birth height, and ponderal index, suggesting its participation in the neonatal growth process. In addition, a gender difference with higher levels of leptin in females neonates was observed, suggesting that the sexual dimorphism in relation to body composition already exists in newborns. Copyright © 2004 by Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria.
Editor: 
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.2223/1204
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-16644378313&partnerID=40&md5=db04f017f8109afefb5c48f8b8301575
Date Issue: 2004
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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