Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/93060
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Adsorption Of Silanes Bearing Nitrogenated Lewis Bases On Sio 2/si (100) Model Surfaces
Author: Andresa J.S.
Reis R.M.
Gonzalez E.P.
Santos L.S.
Eberlin M.N.
Nascente P.A.D.P.
Tanimoto S.T.
Machado S.A.S.
Rodrigues-Filho U.P.
Abstract: The present paper describes the one-pot procedure for the formation of self-assembled thin films of two silanes on the model oxidized silicon wafer, SiO2/Si. SiO2/Si is a model system for other surfaces, such as glass, quartz, aerosol, and silica gel. MALDI-TOF MS with and without a matrix, XPS, and AFM have confirmed the formation of self-assembled thin films of both 3-imidazolylpropyltrimethoxysilane (3-IPTS) and 4-(N- propyltriethoxysilane-imino)pyridine (4-PTSIP) on the SiO2/Si surface after 30 min. Longer adsorption times lead to the deposition of nonreacted 3-IPTS precursors and the formation of agglomerates on the 3-IPTS monolayer. The formation of 4-PTSIP self-assembled layers on SiO2/Si is also demonstrated. The present results for the flat SiO2/Si surface can lead to a better understanding of the formation of a stationary phase for affinity chromatography as well as transition-metal-supported catalysts on silica and their relationship with surface roughness and ordering. The 3-IPTS and 4-PTSIP modified SiO2/Si wafers can also be envisaged as possible built-on-silicon thin-layer chromatography (TLC) extraction devices for metal determination or N-heterocycle analytes, such as histidine and histamine, with "on-spot" MALDI-TOF MS detection. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Editor: 
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.jcis.2005.01.019
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-17744371164&partnerID=40&md5=85fc59e1ba86a3f60a11cfb89ccee5b5
Date Issue: 2005
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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