Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/91651
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Hunting And Use Of Terrestrial Fauna Used By Caiçaras From The Atlantic Forest Coast (brazil)
Author: Hanazaki N.
Alves R.R.N.
Begossi A.
Abstract: Background: The Brazilian Atlantic Forest is considered one of the hotspots for conservation, comprising remnants of rain forest along the eastern Brazilian coast. Its native inhabitants in the Southeastern coast include the Caiçaras (descendants from Amerindians and European colonizers), with a deep knowledge on the natural resources used for their livelihood. Methods: We studied the use of the terrestrial fauna in three Caiçara communities, through open-ended interviews with 116 native residents. Data were checked through systematic observations and collection of zoological material. Results: The dependence on the terrestrial fauna by Caiçaras is especially for food and medicine. The main species used are Didelphis spp., Dasyprocta azarae, Dasypus novemcinctus, and small birds (several species of Turdidae). Contrasting with a high dependency on terrestrial fauna resources by native Amazonians, the Caiçaras do not show a constant dependency on these resources. Nevertheless, the occasional hunting of native animals represents a complimentary source of animal protein. Conclusion: Indigenous or local knowledge on native resources is important in order to promote local development in a sustainable way, and can help to conserve biodiversity, particularly if the resource is sporadically used and not commercially exploited. © 2009 Hanazaki et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
Editor: 
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1186/1746-4269-5-36
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-71049130800&partnerID=40&md5=2d70705d43e8d75df38fd23f96593e26
Date Issue: 2009
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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