Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/90279
Type: Artigo de evento
Title: Comparison Of Downer And Riser Flows In A Circulating Bed By Means Of Optical Fiber Probe Signals Measurements
Author: De Castilho G.J.
Cremasco M.A.
Abstract: In this work, the riser (2.42 m high) and downer (0,85 m high) sections with an ID of 82 mm in both, were analyzed to study the temporal fluid dynamics properties of a circulating bed system in terms of electrical signals of particles concentration obtained by an optical fiber probe. Experiments were conducted using ambient air as the fluid phase and FCC (fluid catalytic cracking) particles as the solid phase. The measurements with the optical fiber probe were conducted in the inlet and outlet zones of both riser and downer. Signals were evaluated in the phase space (chaos analysis), by reconstructing the attractors and calculating the Kolmogorov entropy and the correlation dimension. Results show that the downer presents a less chaotic flow, with lower values of Kolmogorov entropy and correlation dimension, compared to the riser. In the entrance of the downer, the flow is less complex and more predictable in the center due to the effect of the solid feeder. The flow develops in direction of the exit zone and at that position there is no much difference in complexity between the central and wall. In the case of the riser, at the entrance effect is caused by a question of configuration, due to a presence of a curve, making the solid concentration increase toward the wall. In the exit zone, the flow suffers the effect of the abrupt exit. © 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Editor: 
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.proeng.2012.07.420
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84891703914&partnerID=40&md5=676db7658df48e3688b58388494f9dbf
Date Issue: 2012
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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