Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/86440
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Using High Pressure Homogenization (hph) To Change The Physical Properties Of Cashew Apple Juice
Author: Leite T.S.
Augusto P.E.D.
Cristianini M.
Abstract: The High Pressure Homogenization (HPH) process is a non-thermal technology that can be used to change the structure of fluid foods. The main transformations are related to the rheology, particle size distribution (PSD) and pulp sedimentation, and the way that each vegetable matrix responds to the HPH process is unique and hard to predict. In the present study, the effect of HPH (up to 150 MPa) was evaluated for cashew apple juice (10 °Brix) in relation to the rheological properties, PSD, optical microscopy and pulp sedimentation during storage. The HPH process decreased the juice consistency coefficient and yield stress (up to 50 % and 30 % of the original values, respectively). The flow behaviour index increased to nearly twice its original value, and the juice thixotropy was slightly reduced. HPH also decreased the mean particle size and changed the PSD. It had no impact on the final sedimentation index, but decreased the velocity of sedimentation. The microstructure could be observed by optical microscopy, which also showed the decrease in particle size. All the parameters were modelled as a function of the homogenization pressure, which could be useful for a better understanding and as an aid in future studies. The results showed that the HPH process could be used to decrease the cashew apple pulp sedimentation velocity, which could lead to the use of a reduced amount of additives.
Editor: Springer New York LLC
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1007/s11483-014-9385-9
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84916631902&partnerID=40&md5=0dbe037f2f0c4cd6c57a94e3bfdd32be
Date Issue: 2014
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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