Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/86069
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Infratentorial Gray Matter Atrophy And Excess In Primary Craniocervical Dystonia
Author: Piccinin C.C.
Santos M.C.A.
Piovesana L.G.
Campos L.S.
Guimaraes R.P.
Campos B.M.
Torres F.R.
Franca M.C.
Amato-Filho A.C.
Lopes-Cendes I.
Cendes F.
D'Abreu A.
Abstract: Background: Primary craniocervical dystonia (CCD) is generally attributed to functional abnormalities in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamocortical loops, but cerebellar pathways have also been implicated in neuroimaging studies. Hence, our purpose was to perform a volumetric evaluation of the infratentorial structures in CCD. Methods: We compared 35 DYT1/DYT6 negative patients with CCD and 35 healthy controls. Cerebellar volume was evaluated using manual volumetry (DISPLAY software) and infratentorial volume by voxel based morphometry of gray matter (GM) segments derived from T1 weighted 3T MRI using the SUIT tool (SPM8/Dartel). We used t-tests to compare infratentorial volumes between groups. Results: Cerebellar volume was (1.14±0.17)×102cm3 for controls and (1.13±0.14)×102cm3 for patients; p=0.74. VBM demonstrated GM increase in the left I-IV cerebellar lobules and GM decrease in the left lobules VI and Crus I and in the right lobules VI, Crus I and VIIIb. In a secondary analysis, VBM demonstrated GM increase also in the brainstem, mostly in the pons. Conclusion: While gray matter increase is observed in the anterior lobe of the cerebellum and in the brainstem, the atrophy is concentrated in the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, demonstrating a differential pattern of infratentorial involvement in CCD. This study shows subtle structural abnormalities of the cerebellum and brainstem in primary CCD. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
Editor: 
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.parkreldis.2013.10.026
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84893678967&partnerID=40&md5=f7a018a35f071d75bfb489c6fabae240
Date Issue: 2014
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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