Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/85693
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Extraction Of Phenolic Compounds And Anthocyanins From Blueberry (vaccinium Myrtillus L.) Residues Using Supercritical Co2 And Pressurized Liquids
Author: Paes J.
Dotta R.
Barbero G.F.
Martinez J.
Abstract: This work explored the potential of subcritical liquids and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) in the recovery of extracts containing phenolic compounds, antioxidants and anthocyanins from residues of blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) processing. Supercritical CO2 and pressurized liquids are alternatives to the use of toxic organic solvents or extraction methods that apply high temperatures. Blueberry is the fruit with the highest antioxidant and polyphenol content, which is present in both peel and pulp. In the extraction with pressurized liquids (PLE), water, ethanol and acetone were used at different proportions, with temperature, pressure and solvent flow rate kept constant at 40 °C, 20 MPa and 10 ml/min, respectively. The extracts were analyzed and the highest antioxidant activities and phenolic contents were found in the extracts obtained with pure ethanol and ethanol + water. The highest concentrations of anthocyanins were recovered with acidified water as solvent. In supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with CO2, water, acidified water, and ethanol were used as modifiers, and the best condition for all functional components evaluated was SFE with 90% CO2, 5% water, and 5% ethanol. Sixteen anthocyanins were identified and quantified by ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
Editor: Elsevier
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.supflu.2014.07.025
Address: http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84906695403&partnerID=40&md5=e61d7cfa8dc1c8a22e0a86bab2841559
Date Issue: 2014
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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