Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/82083
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Muscle growth in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus): histochemical, ultrastructural and morphometric study
Author: Dal Pai-Silva, M
Carvalho, RF
Pellizzon, CH
Dal Pai, V
Abstract: Muscle growth in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) was studied focusing on histochemical, ultrastructural, and morphometric characteristics of muscle fibers. Based on body length (cm), we studied four groups: G1 = 1.36+/-0.09, G2 = 3.38+/-0.44, G3 = 8.90+/-1.47, and G4 = 28.30+/-3.29 (mean+/-S.D.). All groups showed intense reaction to NADH-TR in subdermal fibers and weak or no reaction in deep layer fibers. In G3 and G4, an intermediate layer was also observed with fibers presenting weak reaction; in G4, groups of fibers with intense reaction were observed in the subdermal region. The myosin ATPase (m-ATPase) activities were acid-stable and alkali-labile in subdermal fibers; most deep layer fibers were alkali-stable and acid-labile. Intermediate fibers were acid-labile and alkali-stable. Two fiber populations were observed near deep muscle layer: one large presenting weak acid- and alkali-stable and the other small alkali-stable. During growth, muscle fiber hypertrophy was more evident in intermediate and white fibers for G3 and G4. However, in these groups, the presence of fiber diameters less than or equal to21 mum suggested that there is still substantial fiber recruitment, confirmed by ultrastructural study, but hypertrophy is the main mechanism contributing to increase in muscular mass. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Subject: fish
muscle fiber
growth
Oreochromis niloticus
Country: Escócia
Editor: Churchill Livingstone
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/S0040-8166(03)00019-3
Date Issue: 2003
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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