Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/76788
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Adiponectin associates positively with nitrite levels in children and adolescents
Author: Belo, VA
Souza-Costa, DC
Lacchini, R
Sertorio, JT
Lanna, CM
Carmo, VP
Tanus-Santos, JE
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To compare the circulating levels of adiponectin and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in eutrophic, eutrophic hypertensive, obese, and obese hypertensive children and adolescents, and to assess whether adiponectin is associated with increased NO bioavailability in these children and adolescents. METHODS: We studied 129 eutrophic, 8 eutrophic hypertensive, 91 obese, and 44 obese hypertensive children and adolescents in this cross-sectional study. Adiponectin concentrations were measured in plasma samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To assess NO bioavailability, nitrite concentrations were measured in whole-blood samples by chemiluminescence. Multiple linear regression analysis was carried out to assess the effects of adiponectin on NO bioavailability. RESULTS: We found no significant differences in nitrite levels among groups (P>0.05). The obese hypertensive group had the lowest adiponectin levels among groups (P<0.05). Additionally, obese subjects had lower adiponectin levels than eutrophic individuals (P<0.05). A multiple linear regression analysis showed that NO bioavailability was positively associated with adiponectin concentrations (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that adiponectin increases NO bioavailability in children and adolescents. Further studies are needed to assess the cardiovascular protective role for this adipokine in childhood obesity.
Subject: children
hypertension
nitric oxide and adiponectin
Country: Inglaterra
Editor: Nature Publishing Group
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2012.104
Date Issue: 2013
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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