Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/74852
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Surface and electronic structure of titanium dioxide photocatalysts
Author: Bilmes, SA
Mandelbaum, P
Alvarez, F
Victoria, NM
Abstract: TiO2 films prepared by sol-gel route are active photocatalysts for the oxidation of organics in photoelectrochemical cells. The as-grown films for photocatalysis applications and those exposed to Ar+ or H-2(+)-Ar+ ion bombardment are characterized by different spectroscopic methods, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-vis transmittance, photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), as well as by conductance. This material has defects associated with oxygen vacancies produced during the sample preparation which support nondissociative adsorption of Oz when films are exposed to air. Charge transfer from reduced Ti species to adsorbed dioxygen leads to Ti-O-2(-) surface complexes that are partially removed by heating at 200 degreesC, and fully removed after 30 min ion bombardment. By comparison with the relatively well-understood structural defects of bombarded TiO2 we arise to a quite complete structural model of the as grown material which corresponds to an amorphous semiconductor possessing relative low disorder and density of states as compared with a pure amorphous material. These TiO2 films are modeled as low size crystalline domain embedded in an amorphous matrix whose electronic structure exhibit exponential band tails and a narrow band close to the conduction band. The latter is fully or partially occupied depending on the presence of adsorbed electron scavengers such as dioxygen.
Country: EUA
Editor: Amer Chemical Soc
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1021/jp0010132
Date Issue: 2000
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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