Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/74638
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Subclinical hypothyroidism increases the risk for depression in the elderly
Author: Chueire, VB
Romaldini, JH
Ward, LS
Abstract: in order to determine if subclinical hypothyroidism is a risk factor for depression in the elderly, a total of 323 individuals over 60 years old were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnosis and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) for mood disturbances. Patients were divided into Group 1: 252 patients (184 females, 68 males; median age: 67 years, range: 60-89 years) with elevated serum thyrotropin (TSH) levels and Group 11: 71 patients (45 females, 26 males; median age: 67 years, range: 60-92 years) with diagnosis of depression. Serum TSH and free thyroxine (fT4) were measured by sensitive assays. Thyroid antibodies were determined by IRMA. Depression was observed in 24 (9.5%) Group I patients and was frequent in subclinical hypothyroidism patients (14/24 = 58.3%). On the other hand, elevated TSH levels were found in 22 (30.9%) Group 11 patients. Depression was observed more frequently among individuals with subclinical (74/149 = 49.7%) hypothyroidism than among individuals with overt hypothyroidism (21/125 = 16.8%) (p < 0.001). Indeed, subclinical hypothyroidism increased the risk for a patient to present depression more than four times (OR = 4.886; 95% confidence interval = 2.768-8.627). Our results demonstrate that subclinical hypothyroidism increases the risk for depression and emphasize the importance of thyroid screening tests in the elderly. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Subject: TSH level
mood disorder
subclinical hypothyroidism
Country: Irlanda
Editor: Elsevier Ireland Ltd
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.archger.2006.02.001
Date Issue: 2007
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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