Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/74431
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Possible Animal Model of Sleep-Related Movement Disorders
Author: Esteves, AM
Lopes, C
Frussa, R
Frank, MK
Cavagnolli, D
Arida, RM
Tufik, S
de Mello, MT
Abstract: Clinical experience suggests that restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic leg movement (PLM), and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may co-occur in both children and adults. The purpose of the present study was to provide an electrocorticography and electromyography evaluation of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) to investigate the potential of this rat strain as an animal model of RLS-PLM. Initial work focused on evaluating sleep patterns and limb movements during sleep in SHR, having normotensive Wistar rats (NWR) as control, followed by comparison of two treatments (pharmacological-dopaminergic agonist treatment and nonpharmacological-chronic physical exercise), known to be clinically beneficial for sleep-related movement disorders. The captured data strengthen the association between SHR and RLS-PLM, revealing a significant reduction on sleep efficiency and slow wave sleep and an increase on wakefulness and limb movements for the SHR group during the dark period, as compared to the NWR group, effects that have characteristics that are strikingly consistent with RLS-PLM. The pharmacological and nonpharmacological manipulations validated these results. The present findings suggest that the SHR may be a useful putative animal model to study sleep-related movement disorders mechanisms.
Subject: attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
periodic leg movement
rats
restless legs syndrome
sleep disorders
Country: Inglaterra
Editor: Routledge Journals, Taylor & Francis Ltd
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1080/00222895.2013.833079
Date Issue: 2013
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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