Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/72860
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Whey Protein/Arabic Gum Gels Formed by Chemical or Physical Gelation Process
Author: Valim, MD
Cavallieri, ALF
Cunha, RL
Abstract: Whey proteins (WP) gelation process with addition of Arabic gum (AG) was studied. Two different driving processes were employed to induce gelation: (1) heating of 12% whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions (w/w) or (2) acidification of previous thermal denatured WPI solutions (5% w/w) with glucono-delta-lactone (GDL). Protein concentrations were different because they were minimal to form gel in these two processes, but denaturation conditions were the same (90 A degrees C/30 min). Water-holding capacity and mechanical properties of the gels were evaluated. The BST equation was used to evaluate the nonlinear part of the stress-strain data. Cold-set gels were weaker than heat-set gels at the pH range near the isoelectric point (pI) of the main whey proteins, but heated gels were more deformable (did not exhibit rupture point) and showed greater elasticity modulus. However, gels formed by heating far from the pI (pH 6.7 or 3.5) showed more fragile structure, indicating that, in these mixed gels, there are prevailing biopolymers interactions. Cold-set and heat-set gels at pH near or below the WP pI showed strain-weakening behavior, but heated gels at neutral pH showed strong strain-hardening behavior. Such results suggest that differences in stress-strain curve at the nonlinear part of the data could be correlated to structure particularities obtained from different gelation processes.
Subject: Whey proteins
Gelation process
Heat-set gels
Cold-set gels
Mechanical properties
BST equation
Country: EUA
Editor: Springer
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1007/s11483-008-9098-z
Date Issue: 2009
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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