Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/71717
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Social media use by government: From the routine to the critical
Author: Kavanaugh, AL
Fox, EA
Sheetz, SD
Yang, S
Li, LT
Shoemaker, DJ
Natsev, A
Xie, LX
Abstract: Social media and online services with user-generated content (e.g., Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, YouTube) have made a staggering amount of information (and misinformation) available. Government officials seek to leverage these resources to improve services and communication with citizens. Significant potential exists to identify issues in real time, so emergency managers can monitor and respond to issues concerning public safety. Yet, the sheer volume of social data streams generates substantial noise that must be filtered in order to de, tect meaningful patterns and trends. Important events can then be identified as spikes in activity, while event meaning and consequences can be deciphered by tracking changes in content and public sentiment. This paper presents findings from a exploratory study we conducted between June and December 2010 with government officials in Arlington, VA (and the greater National Capitol Region around Washington. D.C.), with the broad goal of understanding social media use by government officials as well as community organizations, businesses, and the public at large. A key objective was also to understand social media use specifically for managing crisis situations from the routine (e.g., traffic, weather crises) to the critical (e.g., earthquakes, floods). (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Subject: Digital government
Social media
Crisis informatics
Information visualization
Word cloud
Focus group study
Civic organizations
Country: EUA
Editor: Elsevier Inc
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.giq.2012.06.002
Date Issue: 2012
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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