Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/70475
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Progesterone upregulates GATA-1 on erythroid progenitors cells in liquid culture
Author: Duarte, ADS
Sales, TSI
Mengel, JO
Costa, FF
Saad, STO
Abstract: Steroids hormones modify the hematological features of homozygous sickle cell disease, including the levels of fetal hemoglobin. We used semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of GATA-1, GATA-2, NF-E2, and gamma-globin mRNA levels in a two-phase liquid culture system of human adult erythroid cells in order to assay the effect of progesterone upon gene expression. The levels of expression of GATA-1 and gamma-globin mRNA were significantly increased in cells treated with progesterone compared to untreated cells (1.7- to 2.0-fold). Progesterone treatment did not produce any stimulatory effect upon GATA-2 and NF-E2 mRNA expression. Differences in the synthesis of HbF protein could not be detected by flow cytometry, although we observed a small difference in mean intensity fluorescence between cells treated and cells untreated with progesterone on days 7 and 9. Using anti-transferrin receptor and anti-glycophorin A antibodies, we verified that addition of progesterone did not cause any change in erythroid proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, it is possible that the increased expression of gamma-globin mRNA after progesterone treatment observed in this study may be related to the increased GATA-1 mRNA expression. Interactions of the steroid receptors with the basal transcriptional machinery and with transcription factors might mediate their transcriptional effects. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).
Subject: HbF
progesterone
transcription factors
RT-PCR
gene expression
Country: EUA
Editor: Academic Press Inc Elsevier Science
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1006/bcmd.2002.0551
Date Issue: 2002
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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