Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/65296
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: NEURONAL CEROID-LIPOFUSCINOSIS WITH PROMINENT CHOREA AND WITHOUT VISUAL MANIFESTATIONS A CASE REPORT
Author: Queiroz, LD
Neto, JNC
Abstract: A case of neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis (NCL) is reported in a 11-year-old girl, whose main symptoms were progressive dementia since the age of 4 years and choreic movements since age 10. Seizures, myoclonus and visual deterioration were absent and optic fundi were normal. A cerebral biopsy disclosed two basic types of stored substance in the cytoplasm of neurons: a) severely balloned nerve cells in cortical layers HI and V contained a non-autofluorescent material, which stained with PAS and Sudan Black. in frozen, but not in paraffin sections; ultrastructurally, these neurons showed abundant corpuscles similar to the membranous cytoplasmic bodies of Tay-Sachs disease and, in smaller amounts, also zebra bodies; b) slightly distended or non-distended neurons in all layers contained lipopigment granules, which were autofluorescent, PAS-positive and sudanophil in both frozen and paraffin sections; their ultrastructure was closely comparable to that of lipofuscin. Similar bodies were found in the swollen segments of axons and in a few astrocytes and endothelial cells. The histochemical and ultrastructural demonstration of large amounts of lipopigments allows a presumptive classification of the case as NCL. However, the presence of involuntary movements, the absence of visual disturbances and the unusual ultrastructural features place the patient into a small heterogeneous group within the NCL. A better classification of such unique instances of the disease must await elucidation of the basic enzymatic defects.
Country: Brasil
Editor: Assoc Arquivos Neuro- Psiquiatria
Rights: aberto
Date Issue: 1979
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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