Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/64450
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Effect of Low Intensity Helium-Neon (HeNe) Laser Irradiation on Experimental Paracoccidioidomycotic Wound Healing Dynamics
Author: Ferreira, MC
Gameiro, J
Nagib, PRA
Brito, VN
Vasconcellos, EDC
Verinaud, L
Abstract: The effect of HeNe laser on the extracellular matrix deposition, chemokine expression and angiogenesis in experimental paracoccidioidomycotic lesions was investigated. At days 7, 8 and 9 postinfection the wound of each animal was treated with a 632.8 nm HeNe laser at a dose of 3 J cm(-2). At day 10 postinfection, the wounds were examined by using histologic and immunohistochemical methods. Results revealed that laser-treated lesions were lesser extensive than untreated ones, and composed mainly by macrophages and lymphocytes. High IL-1 beta expression was shown in the untreated group whereas in laser-treated animals the expression was scarce. On the other hand, the expression of CXCL-10 was found to be reduced in untreated animals and quite intensive and well distributed in the laser-treated ones. Also, untreated lesions presented vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a small area near the center of the lesion and high immunoreactivity for hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), whereas laser-treated lesions expressed VEGF surrounding blood vessels and little immunoreactivity for HIF-1. Laser-treated lesions presented much more reticular fibers and collagen deposition when compared with the untreated lesion. Our results show that laser was efficient in minimizing the local effects observed in paracoccidioidomycosis and can be an efficient tool in the treatment of this infection, accelerating the healing process.
Country: EUA
Editor: Wiley-blackwell Publishing, Inc
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1111/j.1751-1097.2008.00423.x
Date Issue: 2009
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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