Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/63802
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: EFFECT OF CHICKEN BONE-MARROW ADDITION TO BREAST AND LEG MEAT SUBJECTED TO DIFFERENT GRINDING PROCESSES
Author: POLLONIO, MAR
ANTUNES, AJ
Abstract: Mechanical deboning makes chicken meat highly suscetible to lipid oxidation. Tissue disruption and the incorporation of unknown amounts of bone marrow are among the main factors involved. This research was undertaken to evaluate the effect of chicken bone marrow addition to breast and leg meat, ground in a regular meat grinder and passed through a mechanical deboner on lipid stability during frozen storage at -18-degrees-C. Breast and leg meat were manually deboned: a portion was processed through a POSS PED 1000 mechanical deboner; another one was ground through a Hobart meat grinder. Bone marrow was removed from chicken bones (tibia and femur), containing 22 mg of total pigments per gram, were added to both samples in order to give a total pigment concentration of 2, 4, 6, and 8 mg/g muscle. After the bone marrow addition, the samples were stored at -18-degrees-C, being removed and analyzed for lipid oxidation after 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120, 135, 150, 165 and 180 days by the TBA method. Our results suggested that the tissue disruption promoted by the deboner made the chicken meat more susceptible to oxidation than the one ground through a Hobart meat grinder. TBA values of both breast and leg meat were always higher for the samples passed through the mechanical deboner as compared to the values for the meat ground in the regular grinder when the total pigment concentration was above 4 mg/g meat.
Subject: POULTRY
STORAGE STABILITY
OXIDATION
Country: Brasil
Editor: Inst Tecnologia Parana
Rights: aberto
Date Issue: 1993
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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