Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/63090
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Chewing side, bite force symmetry, and occlusal contact area of subjects with different facial vertical patterns
Author: Gomes, SGF
Custodio, W
Faot, F
Cury, AAD
Garcia, RCMR
Abstract: Craniofacial dimensions influence oral functions; however, it is not known whether they are associated with function asymmetry. The objective of this study was to evaluate chewing side preference and lateral asymmetry of occlusal contact area and bite force of individuals with different craniofacial patterns. Seventy-eight dentate subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the VERT index as follows: (1) mesofacial, (2) brachyfacial and (3) dolichofacial. Chewing side preference was evaluated using jaw tracking equipment, occlusal contact area was measured by silicon registration of posterior teeth, and bite force was measured unilaterally on molar regions using 2.25 mm-thick sensors. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA on Ranks, Student's t-test, and Mann-Whitney tests at a 5% significance level. Mesofacial, brachyfacial, and dolichofacial subjects presented more occlusal contact area on the left side. Only dolichofacial subjects showed lateral asymmetry for bite force, presenting higher force on the left side. No statistically significant differences were found for chewing side preference among all groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that craniofacial dimensions play a role in asymmetry of bite force. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01286363.
Subject: Bite Force
Dental Occlusion
Face
Mastication
Country: Brasil
Editor: Sociedade Brasileira De Pesquisa Odontologica
Rights: aberto
Date Issue: 2011
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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