Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/62048
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Non-medical anabolic-androgenic steroid consumption and hepatitis B and C virus infection in regular strength training practitioners
Author: Schwingel, PA
Cotrim, HP
dos Santos, CR
Salles, BCR
de Almeida, CER
Zoppi, CC
Abstract: The aim of this study is to analyse the use of non-medical anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) among Brazilian regular strength training practitioners and evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among currently AAS injectors. The survey was addressed to 893 adult healthy males and regular strength-training practitioners from Northeast region of Brazil. Self-reported AAS users were additionally subjected to a physical exam, interview and blood sample collection, to analyse the presence of HBV and HCV. The results showed that punctual prevalence of AAS user was estimated in 16.5% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 14.1 to 19.1). The doses of testosterone and/or its derivatives injected in the last cycle ranged from 200 to 7,200 mg, and AAS vials were purchased predominantly from the black-market. The prevalence of HBV was 0.7% (95% CI: 0.5 to 3.3) and HCV was 0.7% (95% CI: 0.5 to 3.3) without co-infection. Hepatitis infection was associated to elementary educational level (2/29; p<0.05) and steroid vials sharing (2/14; p<0.01). In this sense, AAS use are relevant problem among this population and AAS injectors should be informed and not be neglected in efforts to prevent steroid abuse and harm-reduction strategies to reduce blood-borne virus prevalence among drug injectors.
Subject: Brazil
exercise
anabolic agents
illicit drugs
hepatitis B
hepatitis C
Country: Nigéria
Editor: Academic Journals
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.5897/AJPP12.246
Date Issue: 2012
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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