Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/61303
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Detection of Epstein-Barr virus in tonsillar tissue of children and the relationship with recurrent tonsillitis
Author: Endo, LH
Ferreira, D
Montenegro, MCS
Pinto, GA
Altemani, A
Bortoleto, AE
Vassallo, J
Abstract: Recurrent tonsillitis has been the subject of much investigation. Events considered to predispose to or cause recurrent tonsillitis (RT) include the misuse of antibiotic therapy in acute bouts, alterations in the microflora, structural changes in crypt epithelium and certain viral infections. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection usually occurs in early childhood and can persist in palatine tonsil lymphocytes to induce tonsillitis at a later date. We have examined the presence of EBV in palatine tonsils in order to assess the relationship between this virus and recurrent acute tonsillitis. Tonsils were obtained from 85 patients, 2-14 years old (mean 5.6 years old) who underwent tonsils and adenoid (T&A) removal because of recurrent tonsillitis (RT) or T&A hypertrophy (TH). Tissues specimens were processed for non-isotopic in situ hybridization (ISH) using EBER 1/2 oligonucleolides (EBER RNA). The indications for surgery were RT in 42 patients and TH in 43 patients. In 25 out of 85 cases (29.4%) a positive EBER RNA reaction (15 RT and 33 TH) was found. The chi (2)-test showed no statistically significant difference in frequency of positive results between RT and TH group. We conclude that tonsils of children can be colonized by EBV and that the virus may be implicated in RT and TH. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. Ail rights reserved.
Subject: Epstein-Barr virus
in situ hybridization
recurrent tonsillitis
tonsil hypertrophy
Country: Irlanda
Editor: Elsevier Sci Ireland Ltd
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/S0165-5876(00)00446-8
Date Issue: 2001
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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