Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/60004
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Increased adhesive properties of neutrophils in sickle cell disease may be reversed by pharmacological nitric oxide donation
Author: Canalli, AA
Franco-Penteado, CF
Saad, STO
Conran, N
Costa, FF
Abstract: Increased leukocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium contributes to vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease. Since nitric oxide bioavailability is decreased in sickle cell disease and nitric oxide may inhibit leukocyte adhesion, we investigated whether stimulation of NO-signaling pathways can reduce the adhesive properties of neutrophils from sickle cell disease individuals (sickle cell diseaseneu). sickle cell diseaseneu presented greater adhesion in vitro to both fibronectin and ICAM-1 than control neutrophils. Co-incubation of sickle cell diseaseneu with the nitric oxide-donor agents, sodium nitroprusside and clietheylamine NONOate (DEANO), and the guanylate cyclase stimulator, BAY41-2272, all significantly reduced the increased adhesion to fibronectin/ICAM-1. Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-l-one, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, reversed sodium nitroprusside/DEANO-diminished adhesion to fibronectin, implicating cGMP-dependent signaling in this mechanism. Interestingly, intracellular cGMP was significantly higher in neutrophils from sickle cell disease individuals on hydroxyurea (sickle cell diseaseHUneu). Accordingly, sickle cell diseaseHUneu adhesion to fibronectin/ICAM-1 was significantly lower than that of sickle cell diseaseneu. Agents that stimulate the nitric oxide/cGMP-dependent pathway may have beneficial effects on leukocyte function if used in these subjects.
Subject: adhesion
leukocyte
nitric oxide
sickle cell disease
vaso-occlusion
Country: Itália
Editor: Ferrata Storti Foundation
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.3324/haematol.12119
Date Issue: 2008
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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