Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/57711
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Molar bite force and its correlation with signs of temporomandibular dysfunction in mixed and permanent dentition
Author: Pereira, LJ
Pastore, MG
Bonjardim, LR
Castelo, PM
Gaviao, MBD
Abstract: The aim of the study was to evaluate molar bite force (BF) magnitude and its correlation to the signs of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD), gender, weight, height and age in 101 students ranging in age from 6 to 18 years (32 boys/21 girls with mixed dentition and 23 boys/25 girls with permanent dentition). TMD clinical signs were evaluated using the Craniomandibular Index (CMI), and two subscales, the Dysfunction Index (DI) and the Palpation Index (PI). BF was determined with a pressurized tube connected to a sensor (MPX5700-Motorola SPS). ANOVA, Tukey's test, and Pearson's and Spearman's coefficients were evaluated. BF was higher in the permanent dentition (P < 0.05). There was no difference in BF between genders within the groups, but boys with permanent dentition had higher values than children with mixed dentition (P < 0.05). The girls with permanent dentition presented negative correlation in BF with PI and CMI (P < 0.05). BF was positively correlated with weight, height and age in the permanent dentition group (P < 0.05). It was concluded that BF increased from mixed to permanent dentition, with an assumed enhancing influence of body variables and ageing. The TMD signs in older girls were correlated to decreasing BF, suggesting an influence of muscle tenderness preventing subjects from exerting maximum BF.
Subject: temporomandibular joint disorders
dentition
bite force
body height
body weight
age
Country: Inglaterra
Editor: Blackwell Publishing
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2842.2006.01697.x
Date Issue: 2007
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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