Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/57348
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Cranberry microsatellite marker development from assembled next-generation genomic sequence
Author: Georgi, L
Herai, RH
Vidal, R
Carazzolle, MF
Pereira, GG
Polashock, J
Vorsa, N
Abstract: The large-fruited cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a native North American fruit that is a rich source of dietary phytochemicals with demonstrated and potential benefits for human health. Cranberry is a perennial, self-fertile 2n = 2x = 24 diploid, with a haploid genome size of about 570 Mbp. Present commercial cultivars are only a few breeding and selection cycles removed from their wild progenitors. With an irreducible minimum of 2 years per generation, and significant space and time requirements for phenotypic selection of traits of horticultural interest, genetic enhancement of cranberry could be facilitated by marker-assisted selection (MAS); however, the necessary resources, such as transcript or genomic sequences, molecular genetic markers, and genetic linkage maps, are not yet available. We have begun to generate these resources, starting with next-generation [sequencing by oligonucleotide ligation and detection (SOLiD) mate-paired] sequencing of an inbred cranberry clone, assembling the reads, and developing microsatellite markers from the assembled sequence. Evaluation of the resulting cranberry genomic microsatellite primers has provided a test of the accuracy of the sequence assembly and supplied much-needed molecular markers for a genetic linkage map of cranberry. Mapping these markers will permit sequence scaffolds to be anchored on the genetic map.
Subject: Simple-sequence repeat (SSR)
Cranberry genome
Ericaceae
Country: Holanda
Editor: Springer
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1007/s11032-011-9613-7
Date Issue: 2012
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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