Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/56566
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Metagenomic Analysis of a Tropical Composting Operation at the Sao Paulo Zoo Park Reveals Diversity of Biomass Degradation Functions and Organisms
Author: Martins, LF
Antunes, LP
Pascon, RC
de Oliveira, JCF
Digiampietri, LA
Barbosa, D
Peixoto, BM
Vallim, MA
Viana-Niero, C
Ostroski, EH
Telles, GP
Dias, Z
da Cruz, JB
Juliano, L
Verjovski-Almeida, S
da Silva, AM
Setubal, JC
Abstract: Composting operations are a rich source for prospection of biomass degradation enzymes. We have analyzed the microbiomes of two composting samples collected in a facility inside the Sao Paulo Zoo Park, in Brazil. All organic waste produced in the park is processed in this facility, at a rate of four tons/day. Total DNA was extracted and sequenced with Roche/454 technology, generating about 3 million reads per sample. To our knowledge this work is the first report of a composting whole-microbial community using high-throughput sequencing and analysis. The phylogenetic profiles of the two microbiomes analyzed are quite different, with a clear dominance of members of the Lactobacillus genus in one of them. We found a general agreement of the distribution of functional categories in the Zoo compost metagenomes compared with seven selected public metagenomes of biomass deconstruction environments, indicating the potential for different bacterial communities to provide alternative mechanisms for the same functional purposes. Our results indicate that biomass degradation in this composting process, including deconstruction of recalcitrant lignocellulose, is fully performed by bacterial enzymes, most likely by members of the Clostridiales and Actinomycetales orders.
Country: EUA
Editor: Public Library Science
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0061928
Date Issue: 2013
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.