Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/56161
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Comparative study of sperm ultrastructure of Donax hanleyanus and Donax gemmula (Bivalvia: Donacidae)
Author: Introini, GO
Passos, FD
Recco-Pimentel, SM
Abstract: The ultrastructure of bivalve spermatozoa can be species-specific and often provides important taxonomic traits for systematic reviews and phylogenetic reconstructions. Young individuals of the Donacidae species Donax hanleyanus are often identified as samples of Donax gemmula. Hence, the spermatozoa ultrastructure of both species was described in the present work, aiming to identify characters that could be useful for further taxonomic and phylogenetic analyses. D.hanleyanus and D.gemmula spermatozoa were different especially in relation to acrosomal characteristics and chromatin condensation. The spermatozoon produced by D.hanleyanus had a nucleus (exhibiting granular chromatin with a rope-like appearance) capped by a long and conical acrosomal vesicle, which extended itself outward beyond the anterior nuclear fossa. Otherwise, the nucleus of the sperm cell of D.gemmula showed well-compacted chromatin, and its acrosome, which was partially inserted into the anterior nuclear fossa, had a bubble-like tip. In conclusion, the conspicuous ultra-structural differences found between the spermatozoan morphologies were helpful for the discrimination of the species. In conclusion, our results suggest that analyses of sperm ultrastructure of the bivalves in the family Donacidae can be valuable to investigate their taxonomic relatedness. The present results also contribute to assess the monophyletic status of the family.
Subject: Donacidae
spermatozoa
ultrastructure
bivalve
Country: EUA
Editor: Wiley-blackwell
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1111/j.1463-6395.2012.00565.x
Date Issue: 2013
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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