Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/55677
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: YEAST SUCCESSION IN THE AMAZON FRUIT PARAHANCORNIA-AMAPA AS RESOURCE PARTITIONING AMONG DROSOPHILA SPP
Author: MORAIS, PB
MARTINS, MB
KLACZKO, LB
MENDONCAHAGLER, LC
HAGLER, AN
Abstract: The succession of yeasts colonizing the fallen ripe amapa fruit, from Parahancornia. amapa, aas examined. The occupation of the substrate depended on both the competitive interactions of yeast species, such as the production of killer toxins, and the selective dispersion by the drosophilid guild of the amapa fruit. The yeast community associated with this Amazon fruit differed from those isolated from other fruits in the same forest. The physiological profile of these yeasts was mostly restricted to the assimilation of a few simple carbon sources, mainly L-sorbose, D-glycerol, DL-lactate, cellobiose, and salicin. Common fruit-associated yeasts of the genera Kloeckera and Hanseniaspora, Candida guilliermondii, and Candida krusei colonized fruits during the first three days after the fruit fell. These yeasts were dispersed and served as food for the invader Drosophila malerkotliana. The resident flies of the Drosophila willistoni group fed selectively on patches of yeasts colonizing fruits 3 to 10 days after the fruit fell. The killer toxin-producing yeasts Pichia kluyveri var. kluyveri and Candida fructus were probably involved in the exclusion of some species during the intermediate stages of fruit deterioration. An increase in pH, inhibiting toxin activity and the depletion of simple sugars, may have promoted an increase in yeast diversity in the later stages of decomposition. The yeast succession provided a patchy environment for the drosophilids sharing this ephemeral substrate.
Editor: Amer Soc Microbiology
Rights: aberto
Date Issue: 1995
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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