Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/54148
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Actions of oestradiol and progesterone on the prostate in female gerbils: reversal of the histological effects of castration
Author: Zanatelli, M
Silva, DAL
Shinohara, FZ
Goes, RM
Santos, FCA
Vilamaior, PSL
Taboga, SR
Abstract: The female prostate is a functionally active gland in several mammalian species, including humans and rodents. Investigations of prostate morphophysiology during the phases of the oestrous cycle have shown that the female prostate is influenced by fluctuations in serum concentrations of oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of combined prolonged administration of E2 and P4 on the prostate in ovariectomised female gerbils. Ovariectomy caused atrophy and decreased glandular secretory activity. Administration of E2 and P4 (0.1 mg kg(-1) diluted in 0.1 mL of mineral oil, every 48 h over 30 days) resulted in a recovery of overall prostate structure, as evidenced by increased epithelial height, mass and prostatic secretory activity, without leading the appearance of significant lesions. Evaluation of androgen receptor (AR) expression revealed increased immunoreactivity in the E2+P4-treated group. Immunostaining for oestrogen receptor (ER) alpha was decreased in the castrated groups, but increased in the group subjected to hormone treatment. There were no significant differences in ER beta immunoreactivity among the groups. Assessment of cell proliferation revealed greater immunoreactivity in the treated group. Together, the results indicate that the interaction between E2 and P4 may be responsible for maintaining female prostate gland histophysiology.
Subject: ovariectomy.
Country: Australia
Editor: Csiro Publishing
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1071/RD12302
Date Issue: 2014
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.