Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/53797
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: A simplified ultrasound-based edema score to assess lung injury and clinical severity in septic patients
Author: Santos, TM
Franci, D
Coutinho, CMG
Ribeiro, DL
Schweller, M
Matos-Souza, JR
Carvalho, MA
Abstract: Background: Lung ultrasound (US) is an excellent tool to assess lung edema in a myriad of different clinical situations. We hypothesized that lung US might also be a good prognostic and management instrument in septic patients, regardless of disease severity. Methods: This was a prospective observational cohort study at an urban academic emergency department (ED). Inclusion criteria were as follows: septic patients, at least 18 years old, admitted at the ED of a tertiary hospital. A simplified lung edema scoring system (SLESS) was developed, and 6 thoracic regions were evaluated. Four different lung US patterns were considered, from normal aeration to total consolidation. To evaluate disease severity, the SLESS was compared with the Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis Score and the third version of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score scoring systems. Aiming to assess the effect of the lung edema in the gas exchange, the SLESS was compared with the Pao(2)/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio. Results: Sixty-one patients were enrolled in a 3-month period. The SLESS had a good correlation with the Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis Score and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (r = 0.53 and r = 0.55, respectively; P < .001 for both) and a negative correlation with the Pao(2)/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio (r = -0.62; P < .001). The SLESS also showed correlation with the respiratory rate (r = 0.45; P = .0003). The odds ratio for death related to the SLESS was 1.370 (95% confidence interval, 1.109-1.691; P = .0035). Conclusion: The SLESS is an easy and practical scoring system. It might be a useful tool to predict severity of disease in sepsis patients. The SLESS might also be able to be correlated with the oxygen exchange. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Country: EUA
Editor: W B Saunders Co-elsevier Inc
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.ajem.2013.08.053
Date Issue: 2013
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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