Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/52704
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Loss-of-function mutation in Toll-like receptor 4 prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance
Author: Tsukumo, DML
Carvalho, MA
Carvalheira, JBC
Prada, PO
Hirabara, SM
Schenka, AA
Araujo, EP
Vassallo, J
Curi, R
Velloso, LA
Saad, MJA
Abstract: Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and a state of abnormal inflammatory response. The Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 has an important role in inflammation and immunity, and its expression has been reported in most tissues of the body, including the insulin-sensitive ones. Because it is activated by lipopolysaccharide and saturated fatty acids, which are inducers of insulin resistance, TLR4 may be a candidate for participation in the cross-talk between inflammatory and metabolic signals. Here, we show that C3H/HeJ mice, which have a loss-of-function mutation in TLR4, are protected against the development of diet-induced obesity. In addition, these mice demonstrate decreased adiposity, increased oxygen consumption, a decreased respiratory exchange ratio, improved insulin sensitivity, and enhanced insulin-signaling capacity in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver compared with control mice daring high-fat feeding. Moreover, in these tissues, control mice fed a high-fat diet show an increase in I kappa B kinase complex and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activity, which is prevented in C3H/HeJ mice. In isolated muscles from C3H/ HeJ mice, protection from saturated fatty acid-induced insulin resistance is observed. Thus, TLR4 appears to be an important mediator of obesity and insulin resistance and a potential target for the therapy of these highly prevalent medical conditions.
Country: EUA
Editor: Amer Diabetes Assoc
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.2337/db06-1595
Date Issue: 2007
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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