Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/52638
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Long-term prognosis of cirrhosis after spontaneous bacterial peritonitis treated with ceftriaxone
Author: Franca, AVC
De Souza, JB
Silva, CM
Soares, EC
Abstract: Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a frequent infection in cirrhotic patients with ascites, with a poor prognosis. The aims of this study were to determine the long-term survival of cirrhotic patients with SBP treated with ceftriaxone and to identify predictive factors related to survival. We studied 47 first episodes of SBP treated with ceftriaxone with a mean follow-up of 272 days. Nineteen variables were recorded to evaluate their relation to survival. The most frequent organism that caused SBP was Escherichia coli (40%). Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis resolution was achieved in 67% of patients. After resolution, SBP recurrence was observed in 44% of patients. The cumulative probability of survival was 68.1% at 1 month and 30.8% at 6 months. After uni- and multivariate analyses of all cases, SBP resolution (p=0.0001) and international normalized ratio (INR) (p=0.0057) were found to be related to survival. Another analysis performed after SBP resolution and SBP recurrence showed that ascitic fluid-positive culture (p=0.0344) and INR (p=0.0218) had statistical significance as variables predictive of long-term survival. We conclude that the survival of cirrhotic patients is very short after the first episode of SBP, a fact probably related to advanced liver disease, as liver dysfunction (INR) is the most important factor related to long-term patient survival.
Subject: spontaneous bacterial peritonitis
ceftriaxone
prognosis
long-term survival
Country: EUA
Editor: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1097/00004836-200110000-00007
Date Issue: 2001
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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