Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/52624
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Long-term effect of prolactin treatment on glucose-induced insulin secretion in cultured neonatal rat islets
Author: Crepaldi, SC
Carneiro, EM
Boschero, AC
Abstract: Insulin secretion and Ca-45(2+) uptake and efflux were studied in neonatal rat islets maintained in culture for 7 or 19 days in the absence or presence of prolactin (PRL). Insulin secretion in response to glucose (G), leucine (Leu), arginine (Arg) and carbachol (Cch) was augmented after 7 and 19 days in culture, compared to basal secretion (G 2.8 mM), in both PRL-treated and control islets, However, the increase in insulin secretion induced by the above secretagogues was higher in islets cultured in the presence of PRL for 19 days. In PRL-treated islets, the Ca-45(2+) content after a 5 min incubation in the presence of G, Leu, Arg and Cch was significantly higher than the control only in islets cultured for 19 days. Except with Arg, the Ca-45(2+) uptake in PRL-treated islets after a 90 min incubation was also significantly higher than the control only in islets cultured for 19 days, Finally, Leu-induced alterations in the Ca-45(2+) efflux were higher in PRL-treated than in control islets cultured for 7 or 19 days. In the absence of external Ca2+, the reduction in Ca-45(2+) efflux induced by glucose was also significantly higher in PRL-treated than in control islets. Th is effect was slightly potentiated after 19 days in culture, These data further support the hypothesis that PRL treatment enhances maturation of the secretory mechanism in neonatal islets, This effect can be potentiated even more if the treatment is prolonged.
Subject: neonatal rat islets
PRL
insulin secretion
calcium
Country: Alemanha
Editor: Georg Thieme Verlag
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-979025
Date Issue: 1997
Appears in Collections:Artigos e Materiais de Revistas Científicas - Unicamp

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