Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/357365
Type: Artigo
Title: Intrauterine exposure to oestradiol promotes sex‐specific differential effects on the prostatic development of neonate gerbils
Author: Sanches, Bruno D. A.
Maldarine, Juliana S.
Biancardi, Manoel F.
Santos, Fernanda C. A.
Pinto‐Fochi, Maria E.
Antoniassi, Julia Q.
Góes, Rejane M.
Vilamaior, Patrícia S. L.
Taboga, Sebastião R.
Abstract: The effects of intrauterine exposure to 17β‐oestradiol (E2) are well studied for the male prostate and there are accumulating evidences that the exposure to high dosages leads to a hypomorphic development. However, there is a lack of information about the effects of intrauterine exposure to E2 in the prostate of rodent females, and such research becomes relevant in view of the presence of functional prostate in a proportion of women, and the morphophysiological similarities between the prostate of female rodents and the prostate of women. This study uses histochemical, immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence and three‐dimensional (3D) reconstruction techniques to evaluate the effects of intrauterine exposure to E2 (500 BW/d) on neonatal prostate development in both male and female gerbils. It was verified that intrauterine exposure to E2 promotes epithelial proliferation and growth of prostatic budding in females, whereas in males the prostatic budding shows hypomorphic growth in the VMP (Ventral Mesenchymal Pad) as well as reduced epithelial proliferation. Together, the data demonstrate that intrauterine exposure to E2 causes different effects on male and female prostates of the gerbil even at the early postnatal development of the glan
Subject: Próstata feminina
Country: Reino Unido
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
Rights: Fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1002/cbin.10829
Address: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/cbin.10829
Date Issue: 2017
Appears in Collections:IB - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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