Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/357362
Type: Artigo
Title: Aerobic training prevents cardiometabolic changes triggered by myocardial infarction in ovariectomized rats
Author: Ruberti, Olívia Moraes
Sousa, Andressa Silva
Viana, Laís Rosa
Gomes, Moisés Felipe Pereira
Medeiros, Alessandra
Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra Gomes
Borges, Luciano de Figueiredo
Crestani, Carlos Cesar
Mostarda, Cristiano
Moraes, Telma Fátima da Cunha
Canevarolo, Rafael Renatino
Delbin, Maria Andreia
Rodrigues, Bruno
Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of aerobic training (AT) on autonomic, cardiometabolic, ubiquitin‐proteasome activity, and inflammatory changes evoked by myocardial infarction (MI) in ovariectomized rats. Female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and divided into four groups: sedentary + sham (SS), sedentary + MI (SI), AT + sham surgery (TS), AT + MI (TI). AT was performed on a treadmill for 8 weeks before MI. Infarcted rats previously subjected to AT presented improved physical capacity, increased interleukin‐10, and decreased pro‐inflammatory cytokines. Metabolomic analysis identified and quantified 62 metabolites, 9 were considered significant by the Vip Score. SS, SI, and TS groups presented distinct metabolic profiles; however, TI could not be distinguished from the SS group. MI dramatically increased levels of dimethylamine, and AT prevented this response. Our findings suggest that AT may be useful in preventing the negative changes in functional, inflammatory, and metabolic parameters related to MI in ovariectomized rats
Subject: Infarto do miocárdio
Sistema nervoso
Country: Estados Unidos
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
Rights: Fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1002/jcp.29919
Address: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jcp.29919
Date Issue: 2021
Appears in Collections:IB - Artigos e Outros Documentos
FEF - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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