Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/354197
Type: Artigo
Title: Presence of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes of extraintestinal pathogenic escherichia Coli (expec) in isolates from avian organic fertilizer
Author: Gazal, Luis Eduardo S.
Puno-Sarmiento, Juan J.
Medeiros, Leonardo P.
Cyoia, Paula S.
da Silveira, Wanderlei D.
Kobayashi, Renata K. T.
Nakazato, Gerson
Abstract: Poultry litter is commonly used as fertilizer in agriculture. However, this poultry litter must be processed prior to use, since poultry have a large number of pathogenic microorganisms. The aims of this study were to isolate and genotypically and phenotypically characterize Escherichia coli from avian organic fertilizer. Sixty-four E. coli isolates were identified from avian organic fertilizer and characterized for ExPEC virulence factors, pathogenicity islands, phylogenetic groups, antimicrobial resistance, biofilm formation, and adhesion to HEp-2 cells. Sixty-three isolates (98.4%) showed at least one virulence gene (fimH, ecpA, sitA, traT, iutA, iroN, hlyF, ompT and iss). The predominant phylogenetic groups were groups A (59.3%) and B1 (34.3%). The pathogenicity island CFT073II (51.5%) was the most prevalent among the isolates tested. Thirty-two isolates (50%) were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Approximately 90% of isolates adhered to HEp-2 cells, and the predominant pattern was aggregative adherence (74.1%). In the biofilm assay, it was observed that 75% of isolates did not produce biofilm. These results lead us to conclude that some E. coli isolates from avian organic fertilizer could be pathogenic for humans
Subject: Adubos e fertilizantes
Escherichia coli
Country: Países Baixos
Editor: Elsevier
Rights: Aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.3382/ps/pev278
Address: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0032579119321364
Date Issue: 2015
Appears in Collections:IB - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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