Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/353383
Type: Artigo
Title: Validity and reliability of incremental test to determine the anaerobic threshold in swimming rats
Author: Beck, Wladimir R.
Campesan, Yuri S.
Gobatto, Claudio A.
Abstract: The organic and metabolic consequences of physical exercise are critically modulated depending of the effort intensity and volume. Nevertheless, most of the protocols employed for objectively determine the individual exercise intensities for rats are impractical or unadvisable for various experimental designs. The aim of this study was to individually determine the anaerobic threshold intensity (iAnT) and the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS, gold standard procedure) intensities using a single incremental swimming test for rats, verifying it validity and reliability. Eleven male Wistar rats were submitted twice (48 hours of interval) to an incremental test with overloads from 3% of body mass (% bm), increments of 0.5% bm and stages of 5 min. From blood lactate concentration and % bm data were constructed two linear regressions to determine iAnT. Then, all of the animals performed the MLSS procedure based on iAnT. Comparing iAnT test and re-test were found significant intraclass correlation (r = 0.67; p = 0.01), no significant difference (p = 0.91), coefficient of variation of 4.04% and effect size of 0.02, beyond good agreement, precision and accuracy attested by Bland-Altman plots (bias of 0.010). Furthermore, iAnT was not different from MLSS intensity. A single incremental swimming test comprises a high applicable, valid and reliable tool for objectively and individually determines exercise intensity of swimming rats
Subject: Resistência física
Limiar anaeróbio
Country: Iran
Editor: Asian Exercise and Sport Science Association
Rights: Fechado
Identifier DOI: 0
Address: http://www.ijaep.com/index.php/IJAE/article/view/29
Date Issue: 2015
Appears in Collections:FCA - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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