Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/352763
Type: Artigo
Title: Ultrastructural and biochemical changes induced by salt stress in jatropha curcas seeds during germination and seedling development
Author: Alencar, Nara L. M.
Gadelha, Cibelle G.
Gallão, Maria I.
Dolder, Mary A. H.
Prisco, José T.
Gomes-Filho, Enéas
Abstract: Jatropha curcas L. is a multipurpose species of the Euphorbiaceae family that is widespread in arid and semiarid regions. This study investigated the ultrastructural and biochemical changes induced by salt stress during J. curcas seed germination and seedling development. Salt stress negatively affected seed germination and increased Na+ and Cl– contents in endosperms and embryo-axis. Lipids represented the most abundant reserves (64% of the quiescent seed dry mass), and their levels were strongly decreased at 8 days after imbibition (DAI) under salinity stress. Proteins were the second most important reserve (21.3%), and their levels were also reduced under salt stress conditions. Starch showed a transient increase at 5 DAI under control conditions, which was correlated with intense lipid mobilisation during this period. Non-reducing sugars and free amino acids were increased in control seeds compared with quiescent seeds, whereas under the salt-stress conditions, minimal changes were observed. In addition, cytochemical and ultrastructural analyses confirmed greater alterations in the cellular reserves of seeds that had been germinated under NaCl stress conditions. Salt stress promoted delays in protein and lipid mobilisation and induced ultrastructural changes in salt-stressed endosperm cells, consistent with delayed protein and oil body degradation
Subject: Lipídeos
Amido
Country: Autralia
Editor: C S I R O Publishing
Rights: Aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1071/FP15019
Address: https://www.publish.csiro.au/fp/FP15019
Date Issue: 2015
Appears in Collections:IB - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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