Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/349129
Type: Artigo
Title: Competitive fixed-bed biosorption of Ag(I) and Cu(II) ions on Sargassum filipendula seaweed waste
Author: Nascimento Junior, W. J.
Silva, M. G. C.
Vieira, M. G. A.
Abstract: The dynamic biosorption of multi-metal samples of copper and silver ions was studied in a fixed-bed column employing an alternative biosorbent derived from brown seaweed. Three sets of assays were performed to investigate (1) the effects of the inlet flow rate and (2) the feed composition of the samples and (3) the selective-ion desorption and regeneration of the bed. The greater biosorption capacities (0.642 and 0.387 mmol.g-1 for Cu2+ and Ag+) and removal rates (79.47 and 55.37%) were obtained in the lowest flow (0.5 mL.min-1). The higher residence time is believed to be associated with more favorable mass transfer rates. Silver breakthrough curves evidenced the overshoot effect, which demonstrated to be directly proportional to copper inlet concentration due to the higher affinity for Cu2+ cations. The statistical analysis revealed that the initial concentration of the competitive metal is directly proportional to the biosorption capacity and inversely proportional to the breakthrough time. The height of the mass transfer zone was not statistically influenced by the feed composition in this study. High recovery rates of copper (99.8%) and silver (90.7%) were achieved with Na2-EDTA and HNO3 in selective desorption operation, respectively. A second biosorption cycle exhibited a considerable loss in biosorption capacity up to a breakthrough point
Subject: Tratamento de efluentes
Country: Países Baixos
Editor: Elsevier
Rights: Fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1016/j.jwpe.2020.101294
Address: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214714420301732
Date Issue: Aug-2020
Appears in Collections:FEQ - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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