Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/346872
Type: Artigo
Title: Sucrose and saccharomyces cerevisiae: a relationship most sweet
Author: Marques, Wesley Leoricy
Raghavendran, Vijayendran
Stambuk, Boris Ugarte
Gombert, Andreas Karoly
Abstract: Sucrose is an abundant, readily available and inexpensive substrate for industrial biotechnology processes and its use is demonstrated with much success in the production of fuel ethanol in Brazil. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which naturally evolved to efficiently consume sugars such as sucrose, is one of the most important cell factories due to its robustness, stress tolerance, genetic accessibility, simple nutrient requirements and long history as an industrial workhorse. This minireview is focused on sucrose metabolism in S. cerevisiae, a rather unexplored subject in the scientific literature. An analysis of sucrose availability in nature and yeast sugar metabolism was performed, in order to understand the molecular background that makes S. cerevisiae consume this sugar efficiently. A historical overview on the use of sucrose and S. cerevisiae by humans is also presented considering sugarcane and sugarbeet as the main sources of this carbohydrate. Physiological aspects of sucrose consumption are compared with those concerning other economically relevant sugars. Also, metabolic engineering efforts to alter sucrose catabolism are presented in a chronological manner. In spite of its extensive use in yeast-based industries, a lot of basic and applied research on sucrose metabolism is imperative, mainly in fields such as genetics, physiology and metabolic engineering
Subject: Sacarose
Country: Reino Unido
Editor: Oxford University Press
Rights: Fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1093/femsyr/fov107
Address: https://academic.oup.com/femsyr/article/16/1/fov107/2467713
Date Issue: 2016
Appears in Collections:FEA - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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