Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/342428
Type: Artigo
Title: Use of the aqueous biphasic system as an alternative for concentration of ascaris lumbricoides eggs, with non-toxic separation of faecal residues and fats
Author: Rosa, Stefany Laryssa
dos Santos, Bianca Martins
Soares, Felipe Augusto
Nery Loiola, Saulo Hudson
Inacio, Sandra Valeria
Nagase Suzuki, Celso Tetsuo
Sabadini, Edvaldo
Falcao, Alexandre Xavier
Saraiva Bresciani, Katia Denise
Gomes, Jancarlo Ferreira
Abstract: Human enteroparasites are considered a serious public health problem in underdeveloped countries located in world regions with tropical, subtropical and equatorial climates. These parasites are commonly diagnosed by the Parasitological Examination of Faeces (PEF), performed by conventional techniques and/or commercial kits that result in tests with low-to-moderate sensitivity, due to the use of destructive chemical solvents to parasite structures, and to present excess adipose substance and digestive residues in their microscopic slides. In order to improve the efficacy of these tests/examinations, this study aimed to investigate a new alternative for the PEF, with the use of Aqueous Biphasic System (ABS). For this, four ABSs containing poly (ethylene glycol), PEG (PEG-4000 and PEG-6000), dipotassium phosphate and sodium citrate at different concentrations in the biphasic systems were evaluated with faecal samples containing eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides. The ABS consisting of PEG-4000 and dipotassium phosphate, at concentrations of 55% w/w and 20% w/w, respectively, achieved 100% satisfactory results compared to the conventional TF-Test technique in terms of preservation and concentration of A. lumbricoides eggs, with adequate separation of digestive residues, without using a centrifuge or chemical solvents that may cause harm to the parasites. This study presents ABS as a new low-cost technical principle for the detection of parasite eggs in PEF. The new technique is simple, fast, non-toxic, not harmful to the parasite and does not require a centrifuge. Human enteroparasites are considered a serious public health problem in underdeveloped countries located in world regions with tropical, subtropical and equatorial climates. These parasites are commonly diagnosed by the Parasitological Examination of Faeces (PEF), performed by conventional techniques and/or commercial kits that result in tests with low-to-moderate sensitivity, due to the use of destructive chemical solvents to parasite structures, and to present excess adipose substance and digestive residues in their microscopic slides. In order to improve the efficacy of these tests/examinations, this study aimed to investigate a new alternative for the PEF, with the use of Aqueous Biphasic System (ABS). For this, four ABSs containing poly (ethylene glycol), PEG (PEG-4000 and PEG-6000), dipotassium phosphate and sodium citrate at different concentrations in the biphasic systems were evaluated with faecal samples containing eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides. The ABS consisting of PEG-4000 and dipotassium phosphate, at concentrations of 55% w/w and 20% w/w, respectively, achieved 100% satisfactory results compared to the conventional TF-Test technique in terms of preservation and concentration of A. lumbricoides eggs, with adequate separation of digestive residues, without using a centrifuge or chemical solvents that may cause harm to the parasites. This study presents ABS as a new low-cost technical principle for the detection of parasite eggs in PEF. The new technique is simple, fast, non-toxic, not harmful to the parasite and does not require a centrifuge
Subject: Diagnóstico
Country: Reino Unido
Editor: Wiley
Rights: Fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1111/tmi.13308
Address: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/tmi.13308
Date Issue: 2019
Appears in Collections:IQ - Artigos e Outros Documentos
FCM - Artigos e Outros Documentos
IC - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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