Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/337203
Type: Artigo
Title: Hydrochemistry and isotopic studies of carbonatite groundwater systems: the alkaline-carbonatite complex of Barreiro, southeastern Brazil
Author: Raposo, Daniel Bernardes
Pereira, Sueli Yoshinaga
Abstract: In Brazil, alkaline intrusions are source rocks for several commodities (bauxite, phosphate, niobium and barite, to mention a few), including mineral water. The present study aims to understand by means of chemical and stable isotope analyses, the residence time, circulation and hydrochemical facies of the groundwater systems from the alkaline-carbonatitic complex of Barreiro (State of Minas Gerais, Brazil). This Mesozoic alkaline complex is located in the Brazilian tropical region characterized by weathered soils and fractured rocks, which play an important role in the groundwater dynamics. To assess this influence, groundwater samples from 12 points and water samples from 3 artificial lakes were collected for the determination of chemical element and natural isotope (O-18, deuterium and C-13) concentrations and C-14 and tritium dating. Two main groundwater categories were revealed: (a) a local, acidic and sub-modern groundwater system developed in thick, poorly mineralized weathered soil from the inner part of ACCB, and (b) a basic, hypothermal, ca. 40-ky-old fractured aquifer developed in mineralized fenitized quartzites. The younger and shallower groundwater circulation is controlled by the present intrusion relief and is prone to environmental impacts. The older, hypothermal groundwater system indicates existing geothermal residual heat provided by the Mesozoic alkaline intrusion
Subject: Águas subterrâneas
Química da água
Tritio
Country: Alemanha
Editor: Springer
Rights: Fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1007/s12665-019-8228-x
Address: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12665-019-8228-x
Date Issue: 2019
Appears in Collections:IG - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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