Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/329333
Type: Artigo
Title: Risk Factors For Bartonella Species Infection In Blood Donors From Southeast Brazil
Author: Diniz
Pedro Paulo Vissotto de Paiva; Neves Ferreira Velho
Paulo Eduardo; Urso Pitassi
Luiza Helena; Drummond
Marina Rovani; Lania
Bruno Grosselli; Barjas-Castro
Maria Lourdes; Sowy
Stanley; Breitschwerdt
Edward B.; Scorpio
Diana Gerardi
Abstract: Bacteria from the genus Bartonella are emerging blood-borne bacteria, capable of causing long-lasting infection in marine and terrestrial mammals, including humans. Bartonella are generally well adapted to their main host, causing persistent infection without clinical manifestation. However, these organisms may cause severe disease in natural or accidental hosts. In humans, Bartonella species have been detected from sick patients presented with diverse disease manifestations, including cat scratch disease, trench fever, bacillary angiomatosis, endocarditis, polyarthritis, or granulomatous inflammatory disease. However, with the advances in diagnostic methods, subclinical bloodstream infection in humans has been reported, with the potential for transmission through blood transfusion been recently investigated by our group. The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with Bartonella species infection in asymptomatic blood donors presented at a major blood bank in Southeastern Brazil. Five hundred blood donors were randomly enrolled and tested for Bartonella species infection by specialized blood cultured coupled with high-sensitive PCR assays. Epidemiological questionnaires were designed to cover major potential risk factors, such as age, gender, ethnicity, contact with companion animals, livestock, or wild animals, bites from insects or animal, economical status, among other factors. Based on multivariate logistic regression, bloodstream infection with B. henselae or B. clarridgeiae was associated with cat contact (adjusted OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.1-9.6) or history of tick bite (adjusted OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 1.3-13.4). These risk factors should be considered during donor screening, as bacteremia by these Bartonella species may not be detected by traditional laboratory screening methods, and it may be transmitted by blood transfusion.
Editor: Public Library Science
San Francisco
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0004509
Address: http://journals.plos.org/plosntds/article?id=10.1371/journal.pntd.0004509
Date Issue: 2016
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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