Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/328240
Type: Artigo
Title: Migration Velocity Analysis Using Residual Diffraction Moveout: A Real-data Example
Migration velocity analysis using residual diffraction moveout: a real-data example
Author: Gonzalez, Jaime A. C.
Figueiredo, José J. S. de
Coimbra, Tiago A.
Schleicher, Jörg
Novais, Amélia
Abstract: Unfocused seismic diffraction events carry direct information about errors in the migration-velocity model. The residual-diffraction-moveout (RDM) migration-velocity-analysis (MVA) method is a recent technique that extracts this information by means of adjusting ellipses or hyperbolas to uncollapsed migrated diffractions. In this paper, we apply this method, which has been tested so far only on synthetic data, to a real data set from the Viking Graben. After application of a plane-wave-destruction (PWD) filter to attenuate the reflected energy, the diffractions in the real data become interpretable and can be used for the RDM method. Our analysis demonstrates that the reflections need not be completely removed for this purpose. Beyond the need to identify and select diffraction events in post-stack migrated sections in the depth domain, the method has a very low computational cost and processing time. To reach an acceptable velocity model of comparable quality as one obtained with common-midpoint (CMP) processing, only two iterations were necessary.
Unfocused seismic diffraction events carry direct information about errors in the migration-velocity model. The residual-diffraction-moveout (RDM) migration-velocity-analysis (MVA) method is a recent technique that extracts this information by means of adjusting ellipses or hyperbolas to uncollapsed migrated diffractions. In this paper, we apply this method, which has been tested so far only on synthetic data, to a real data set from the Viking Graben. After application of a plane-wave-destruction (PWD) filter to attenuate the reflected energy, the diffractions in the real data become interpretable and can be used for the RDM method. Our analysis demonstrates that the reflections need not be completely removed for this purpose. Beyond the need to identify and select diffraction events in post-stack migrated sections in the depth domain, the method has a very low computational cost and processing time. To reach an acceptable velocity model of comparable quality as one obtained with common-midpoint (CMP) processing, only two iterations were necessary.
Subject: Diffraction Imaging
Velocity Analysis
Local Slope
Seismic Imaging
Difração
Velocidade
Ondas sísmicas
Método sísmico de reflexão
Geofísica
Country: Reino Unido
Editor: Oxford University Press
Citation: Journal Of Geophysics And Engineering. Iop Publishing Ltd, v. 13, p. 622 - 633, 2016.
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1088/1742-2132/13/4/622
Address: https://academic.oup.com/jge/article/13/4/622/5111173
Date Issue: 2016
Appears in Collections:IMECC - Artigos e Outros Documentos

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
000384024600016.pdf6.67 MBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.