Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/327233
Type: Artigo
Title: Alterations Of Intestinal Microbiome By Antibiotic Therapy In Hospitalized Children
Alterations of intestinal microbiome by antibiotic therapy in hospitalized children
Author: Fernandes, Miriam R.
Ignacio, Aline
Rodrigues, Viviane A. A.
Groppo, Francisco C.
Cardoso, Ary L.
Avila-Campos, Mario J.
Nakano, Viviane
Abstract: The administration of antimicrobial agents leads to an ecological imbalance of the host-microorganisms relationship, and it causes a rapid and significant reduction in the microbial diversity. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of antibiotic therapy on intestinal microbiota of children between 3 and 12 years of age. The fecal samples were collected from hospitalized children (n = 31) and from healthy untreated children (n = 30). The presence of bacteria and their quantities were assessed by culture-based methods and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). By culture method, in the children receiving antibiotics, a low recovery of Bifidobacterium spp. (54.8%), Bacteroides spp./Parabacteroides spp. (54.8%), Clostridium spp. (35.5%), and Escherichia coli (74.2%) was observed compared with the children without antibiotic therapy (100%, 80%, 63.3%, and 86.6%, respectively). By qPCR, the children receiving antibiotics showed a lower copy number for all microorganisms, except to Lactobacillus spp. (p = 0.0092). In comparison to the nontreated children, the antibiotic-treated children showed a significantly lower copy number of Bifidobacterium spp. (p = 0.0002), Clostridium perfringens (p < 0.0001), E. coli (p = 0.0268), Methanobrevibacter smithii (p = 0.0444), and phylum Firmicutes (p = 0.0009). In conclusion, our results obtained through qualitative and quantitative analyses, demonstrate that antibiotic therapy affect the intestinal microbiome of children.
The administration of antimicrobial agents leads to an ecological imbalance of the host-microorganisms relationship, and it causes a rapid and significant reduction in the microbial diversity. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of antibiotic therapy on intestinal microbiota of children between 3 and 12 years of age. The fecal samples were collected from hospitalized children (n = 31) and from healthy untreated children (n = 30). The presence of bacteria and their quantities were assessed by culture-based methods and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). By culture method, in the children receiving antibiotics, a low recovery of Bifidobacterium spp. (54.8%), Bacteroides spp./Parabacteroides spp. (54.8%), Clostridium spp. (35.5%), and Escherichia coli (74.2%) was observed compared with the children without antibiotic therapy (100%, 80%, 63.3%, and 86.6%, respectively). By qPCR, the children receiving antibiotics showed a lower copy number for all microorganisms, except to Lactobacillus spp. (p = 0.0092). In comparison to the nontreated children, the antibiotic-treated children showed a significantly lower copy number of Bifidobacterium spp. (p = 0.0002), Clostridium perfringens (p < 0.0001), E. coli (p = 0.0268), Methanobrevibacter smithii (p = 0.0444), and phylum Firmicutes (p = 0.0009). In conclusion, our results obtained through qualitative and quantitative analyses, demonstrate that antibiotic therapy affect the intestinal microbiome of children
Subject: Microbiome
Antibiotic Therapy
Children
Anaerobic Bacteria
Escherichia Coli
Escherichia coli; Bactérias anaeróbias; Criança
Country: Estados Unidos
Editor: Mary Ann Liebert 
Citation: Microbial Drug Resistance. Mary Ann Liebert Inc, v. 23, p. 56 - +, 2017.
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1089/mdr.2015.0320
Address: https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/mdr.2015.0320
Date Issue: 2017
Appears in Collections:FOP - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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