Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/326347
Type: Artigo
Title: Effects Of Nitrogen Availability On The Competitive Interactions Between An Invasive And A Native Grass From Brazilian Cerrado
Author: Eller
Cleiton B.; Oliveira
Rafael S.
Abstract: Nitrogen (N) deposition is currently widespread in many ecosystems and often promotes shifts in plant composition towards invasive species. In this study we evaluated how soil N availability affects the competitive interactions between a native Cerrado grass (Aristida riparia) and an invasive African grass (Melinis minutiflora). We evaluated the effects of increased soil N and the presence of another species on the relative growth rate (RGR), relative competition intensity (RCI), shoot N concentration and delta N-15, intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) and N productivity (A) of the two grasses in a glasshouse experiment. We found that the presence of M. minutiflora reduces the RGR of A. riparia by 52 % under high N availability, and by 29 % under low N availability. The shoot N and delta N-15 patterns of A. riparia when grown together with M. minutiflora indicate that the exotic species interferes with the native species' N acquisition. However, the lower RGR and iWUE of A. riparia observed only when grown together with M. minutiflora under high N availability suggests that other mechanisms might also limit A. riparia growth. We predict that the global trend of N deposition in ecosystems might facilitate the spread of M. minituflora in Cerrado areas.
Subject: Biological Invasions
Competition
Exotic Species
Global Change
N Deposition
Savanna
Editor: Springer
Dordrecht
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1007/s11104-016-2984-0
Address: https://link-springer-com.ez88.periodicos.capes.gov.br/article/10.1007/s11104-016-2984-0
Date Issue: 2017
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

Files in This Item:
File SizeFormat 
000392392200005.pdf557.24 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.