Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/319256
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: The Carbohydrate Influence On The Brain Activation During Exercise [a Influência Do Carboidrato Na Ativação Cerebral Durante Exercício Físico]
Abstract: The use of carbohydrate (CH) as a nutritional supplement is related to better sports performance. Some studies have noted a relationship between consumption and brain activation influencing the performance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of CH consumption in the activation of certain brain areas during exercise, performed simultaneously the acquisition of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Ten men cyclists (32.1 ± 4.1 years, weight 76.8 ± 14.6 kg) performed a pedaling exercise protocol, with high intensity (Borg Scale), on a cycleergometer coupled to magnetic resonance (MR) and ingested 50g CH or placebo in the range of two sets of exercise. The CH ingestion showed influence on brain areas during exercise, activating areas related to decision-making (insula) and motivation (limbic system) and mainly disabling motor areas (frontal lobe) and introspection (precuneus). With the use of placebo, there was also activation of important areas in the motivation of the individual (posterior cingulate). In addition, areas associated with the initiation and maintenance of movement, located on the front lobe and cerebellum, was active. With the use of CH, areas important for maintenance of the exercise have been activated showing that supplementation can influence the brain activation during exercise to improve the sport performance.
Editor: Edicoes Desafio Singular
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.6063/motricidade.6617
Address: https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-84976402826&partnerID=40&md5=4e8238cc8ec3357e179dcbdd272a9ff9
Date Issue: 2016
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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