Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/318939
Type: research-article
Title: Biological Evaluation of PLDLA Polymer Synthesized as Construct on Bone Tissue Engineering Application
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Author: Más
Bruna Antunes; Freire
Diego Coutinho de Luna; Cattani
Silvia Mara de Melo; Motta
Adriana Cristina; Barbo
Maria Lourdes Peris; Duek
Eliana Aparecida de Rezende
Abstract: In bone tissue engineering, cell-scaffold constructs are used to stimulate complete, functional tissue replacement that does not occur naturally in critical-size defects. In this report, we describe the application potential of poly (L-co-D,L lactic acid)-PLDLA 70/30, synthesized in house as constructs loaded with osteoblast-like cells on bone tissue engineering. In vitro biological results show that the porogen leached PLDLA scaffolds are cytocompatible with osteoblast cells, able to stimulate significant cells growth during the first 14 days of culture, during which the morphology and cell behavior of osteoblasts cultured on the scaffolds were monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In vivo, PLDLA constructs were implanted in 5 mm bilateral critical-size defects created in rat-calvariae and then evaluated histologically 8 and 12 weeks after implantation. The histological results showed that PLDLA constructs supported the growth of new tissue, with a degradation rate close to that of native bone formation and decrease of inflammatory response over time of implantation. These data provide evidences that the synthesized PLDLA polymer has application potential as construct for bone tissue engineering.
Citation: Materials Research, 19, 2, p.300-. 2016.
Rights: aberto
Identifier DOI: 10.1590/1980-5373-MR-2015-0559
Address: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1516-14392016000200300
Date Issue: 2016
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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